Kudos Indeed: Happy Chanukah

Okay, okay.   Life and politics are not totally negative, bereft of any situations that deserve kudos.  Being a constant Gloomy Gus is just not that attractive.  So I bring you Chanukah cheer tonight with a comical video of a great Jewish wedding:

Also, I could not help laughing out loud on this play of words meant for Noam Chomsky, the linguist whom I wrote about in my post “Language and Syntax: Loretta and Sarah” on December 3, 2009.  The deep academic respect I have for Chomsky still stands, but I do think even he would get a chuckle from this photo and the linguistic double entendre:

Garden Noam Chomsky

via Politics on HuffingtonPost.com by The Huffington Post News Team on 12/7/09

Via BoingBoing, comes this amazing picture of a “Garden Noam Chomsky” — a sculpture featured in The Nation’s charity auction this year. It’s a tiny likeness of linguistics guru Noam Chomsky who actually looks like this, when not painted.

Finally, I erred in my post yesterday.  I was unable to find any event worthy of kudos.  I take that back.  My friend Chrisetta and her long-standing Honey announced their engagement on Monday and I am thrilled for them.  Even though the world is often too much with us, it is these personal moments of happiness that make the journey so worthwhile.  Much love, happiness and loyalty to the lucky couple.

The first night of Chanukah is tonight.  The lore handed down through the ages celebrates this holiday as a reminder of our freedom.  Just like the metaphor of life in general, Chanukah’s real story has been altered a bit to fit the occasion:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/11/opinion/11brooks.html?em

David Brooks’ last sentence says it all, whether referring to Chanukah, health care reform, capitalism in its corrupt form, political bargain-making and endless wars:

The lesson of Hanukkah is that even the struggles that saved a people are dappled with tragic irony, complexity and unattractive choices.

Andrew Sullivan today, in addressing President Obama’s acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize, nailed life’s philosophy in a nutshell.  Being wracked with disappointment over man’s inhumanity to his fellow man, irritated over the self-interested governments, fed up with the snail’s pace of actual change and downright disgusted with the constant criticism of our current President, I am appreciating the state of our world with a much deeper understanding.  I extend kudos to President Obama in celebration of his Peace Prize.  Sure: the rationale for bestowing that prize on President Obama was for his aspirations.  Solidifying actions will occur later in his career.  But who the hell else is even talking about the hope and change we so desperately need?  No one.  Please read Sullivan’s article:

http://andrewsullivan.theatlantic.com/the_daily_dish/2009/12/the-tragedy-of-hope.html

And now ….. fry up the latkes, light that first candle and be ever so grateful for our freedom.  Happy Chanukah!

POSTSCRIPT:

Apparently great minds think alike.  Robert Reich had the exact same thought as I did on the death of the public option.  Our lawmakers either have no balls or are opting to continue to line their own golden pockets with $ from the private insurance industry.  Probably both.  And it is the great American temperament to sit by and let this havoc and mayhem continue, all for the false premise that “we passed a health care bill”:

http://robertreich.blogspot.com/

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